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    Important formulas for blow room section:


                                                                          Amount of Trash removal
    Cleaning Efficiency of Blow room section: -------------------------------- x 100
                                                                          Total amount of Trash

                           Length of Lap (yds)                 Unit weight
    Lap Hank : -------------------------------- x --------------------------
                              Unit length                          Weight of Lap (lb)


                                           Surface speed of calendar roller x 60 x Eff % x wastage % x scatcher number
    Production of Blow room/hr : ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ,lb
                                                                   36 x 840 x hank

                                  D    Knock off Wheel       Warm Wheel
    Length of Lap : ----- x ------------------------ x -------------------, yds (D= Dia of Bottom calendar roller)
                               36            Change Wheel       Single Warm

    Important Formulas for Cotton Carding Section:


                               Present DCP x Present Hank           Present DCP x New Sliver weight
    Required DCP :  ---------------------------------- =      -------------------------------------------
                                    Required Hank                            Present Sliver weight


                            Lap Length (Yds) x 1 lb
    Lap Hank :  ------------------------------------
                           840 x Lap weight (lb)


                                              Sliver Length (Yds) x 1 lb
    Carded Sliver Hank :  ------------------------------------
                                              840 x Sliver weight (lb)


                              Carded Sliver Hank           Feed or Lap Weight       Mechanical Draft x 100
    Actual Draft :  ------------------------   =    ---------------------------  =  -----------------------
                               Feed or Lap Hank            Carded Sliver Weight           100 - wastage


                                  Actual Draft x 100 - wastage            Draft Constant
    Mechanical Draft : ----------------------------------     =   ---------------------
                                               100                                              DCP


                                                         Speed of the circumference of Doffer (inch/min) x Efficiency x 60
    Production of Carding Machine:  --------------------------------------------------------------------------, lb/hr
                                                                                         36 x 840 x Hank

    or

                           Speed of the circumference of Calendar roller (inch/min) x Eff x 60 x Tension Draft
    Production of Carding Machine:  --------------------------------------------------------------------------, lb/hr
                                                                                         36 x 840 x Hank




    Textile Calculations | All Formulae of Textile Calcualtions for Spinning/Weaving/Knitting

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

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    Important formulas for blow room section:


                                                                          Amount of Trash removal
    Cleaning Efficiency of Blow room section: -------------------------------- x 100
                                                                          Total amount of Trash

                           Length of Lap (yds)                 Unit weight
    Lap Hank : -------------------------------- x --------------------------
                              Unit length                          Weight of Lap (lb)


                                           Surface speed of calendar roller x 60 x Eff % x wastage % x scatcher number
    Production of Blow room/hr : ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ,lb
                                                                   36 x 840 x hank

                                  D    Knock off Wheel       Warm Wheel
    Length of Lap : ----- x ------------------------ x -------------------, yds (D= Dia of Bottom calendar roller)
                               36            Change Wheel       Single Warm

    Important Formulas for Cotton Carding Section:


                               Present DCP x Present Hank           Present DCP x New Sliver weight
    Required DCP :  ---------------------------------- =      -------------------------------------------
                                    Required Hank                            Present Sliver weight


                            Lap Length (Yds) x 1 lb
    Lap Hank :  ------------------------------------
                           840 x Lap weight (lb)


                                              Sliver Length (Yds) x 1 lb
    Carded Sliver Hank :  ------------------------------------
                                              840 x Sliver weight (lb)


                              Carded Sliver Hank           Feed or Lap Weight       Mechanical Draft x 100
    Actual Draft :  ------------------------   =    ---------------------------  =  -----------------------
                               Feed or Lap Hank            Carded Sliver Weight           100 - wastage


                                  Actual Draft x 100 - wastage            Draft Constant
    Mechanical Draft : ----------------------------------     =   ---------------------
                                               100                                              DCP


                                                         Speed of the circumference of Doffer (inch/min) x Efficiency x 60
    Production of Carding Machine:  --------------------------------------------------------------------------, lb/hr
                                                                                         36 x 840 x Hank

    or

                           Speed of the circumference of Calendar roller (inch/min) x Eff x 60 x Tension Draft
    Production of Carding Machine:  --------------------------------------------------------------------------, lb/hr
                                                                                         36 x 840 x Hank




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    Yarn Count: Count is a numerical value, which express the coarseness or fineness (diameter) of the yarn and also indicate the relationship between length and weight (the mass per unit length or the length per unit mass) of that yarn. Therefore, the concept of yarn count has been introduced which specifies a certain ratio of length to weight.

    Type of Yarn Count:

    One distinguishes between two systems:

    Direct Count System:

    The weight of a fixed length of yarn is determined. The weight per unit length is the yarn count! The common features of all direct count systems are the length of yarn is fixed and the weight of yarn varies according yo its fineness.

    The following formula is used to calculate the yarn count:


           W x l
    N = ------
             L
    Here,

    N= Yarn count or numbering system
    W = Weight of the sample at the official regain in the unit of the system. 
    L = Length of the sample
    l = Unit of length of the sample.




    Definition of the above system is as follows :

    • Tex System : No of grams per 1000 meters
    • Denier: No Of grams per 9000 meters
    • Deci Tex : No Of Grams per 10000 meters
    • Millitex : No of milligrams per 1000 meters
    • Kilotex: No Of Kilograms per 1000 meters
    • Jute Count: No Of lb per 14,400 yds

    The Tex of a yarn indicates the weight in grams of 1000 meters yarn, thus 40 Tex means 1000 meters of yarn weight 40 gram.

    The Denier of a yarn indicates the weight in grams of 9000 meters yarn, thus 150 D means 9000 meters of yarn weight 150 grams and 100 D means 9000 meters of yarn weight 100 gm.

    From above discussion it is concluded that higher the yarn number (count) coarser the yarn and lower the umber finer the yarn.


    Indirect Count System:

    The length of a fixed weight of yarn is measured. The length per unit weight is the yarn count.

    The common features of all indirect count systems are the weight of yarn is fixed and the length of yarn varies according to its fineness.

    The following formula is used to calculate the yarn count:


            L x w
    N = ---------
            W x l

    Here,

    N= Yarn count or numbering system
    W = Weight of the sample at the official regain in the unit of the system. 
    L = Length of the sample
    l = Unit of length of the sample.
    w = Unit of length of the sample



    Definition of the above system is as follows:

    • English count system (Ne) : No of 840 yds lengths per pound
    • Metric Count System (Nm) : No of Kilometers per kilogram
    • Woollen Count (YSW) : No of 256 yds lengths per pound
    • Worsted Count, NeK: No of 560 yd lengths per pound
    • Linen count, NeL : No of 300 yd lengths per pound

    The English Count, Ne indicates how many hanks of 840 yards length weigh one English pound. Thus, 32Ne means 32 hanks of 849 yards, i.e. 32x840 yards length weight one pound.

    The Metric Count, Nm indicates how many hanks of 1000 meters length weigh one kg. Thus 50Nm means 50 hanks of 1000 meters i.e. 50x1000 meters length weigh one kg and 100Nm means 100 hanks of 1000 meters i.e. 100x1000 meters length weigh one kg.

    From above discussion it is concluded that higher the yarn number or yarn count finer the yarn and lower the number or count coarser the yarn.

    Most important conversion factors:

    • 1 yard = 0.9144 meter
    • 1 meter = 1.0936 yard
    • 1 meter = 39.37 inch
    • 1 cm = 0.3937 inch
    • 1inch = 2.54 cm
    • 1 m2 = 1.1960 yd2
    • 1 gm = 0.0353 oz
    • 1 oz = 28.350 gm
    • 1 lb (pound) = 453.6 gm
    • 1 lb = 0.4536 kg
    • 1 kg = 2.2046 lb (pound)
    • 1 m/kg - 0.4961 yd/lb 
    • 1 yd/lb = 2.0159 m/k

    What is Yarn Count? | Yarn Numbering System

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

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    Yarn Count: Count is a numerical value, which express the coarseness or fineness (diameter) of the yarn and also indicate the relationship between length and weight (the mass per unit length or the length per unit mass) of that yarn. Therefore, the concept of yarn count has been introduced which specifies a certain ratio of length to weight.

    Type of Yarn Count:

    One distinguishes between two systems:

    Direct Count System:

    The weight of a fixed length of yarn is determined. The weight per unit length is the yarn count! The common features of all direct count systems are the length of yarn is fixed and the weight of yarn varies according yo its fineness.

    The following formula is used to calculate the yarn count:


           W x l
    N = ------
             L
    Here,

    N= Yarn count or numbering system
    W = Weight of the sample at the official regain in the unit of the system. 
    L = Length of the sample
    l = Unit of length of the sample.




    Definition of the above system is as follows :

    • Tex System : No of grams per 1000 meters
    • Denier: No Of grams per 9000 meters
    • Deci Tex : No Of Grams per 10000 meters
    • Millitex : No of milligrams per 1000 meters
    • Kilotex: No Of Kilograms per 1000 meters
    • Jute Count: No Of lb per 14,400 yds

    The Tex of a yarn indicates the weight in grams of 1000 meters yarn, thus 40 Tex means 1000 meters of yarn weight 40 gram.

    The Denier of a yarn indicates the weight in grams of 9000 meters yarn, thus 150 D means 9000 meters of yarn weight 150 grams and 100 D means 9000 meters of yarn weight 100 gm.

    From above discussion it is concluded that higher the yarn number (count) coarser the yarn and lower the umber finer the yarn.


    Indirect Count System:

    The length of a fixed weight of yarn is measured. The length per unit weight is the yarn count.

    The common features of all indirect count systems are the weight of yarn is fixed and the length of yarn varies according to its fineness.

    The following formula is used to calculate the yarn count:


            L x w
    N = ---------
            W x l

    Here,

    N= Yarn count or numbering system
    W = Weight of the sample at the official regain in the unit of the system. 
    L = Length of the sample
    l = Unit of length of the sample.
    w = Unit of length of the sample



    Definition of the above system is as follows:

    • English count system (Ne) : No of 840 yds lengths per pound
    • Metric Count System (Nm) : No of Kilometers per kilogram
    • Woollen Count (YSW) : No of 256 yds lengths per pound
    • Worsted Count, NeK: No of 560 yd lengths per pound
    • Linen count, NeL : No of 300 yd lengths per pound

    The English Count, Ne indicates how many hanks of 840 yards length weigh one English pound. Thus, 32Ne means 32 hanks of 849 yards, i.e. 32x840 yards length weight one pound.

    The Metric Count, Nm indicates how many hanks of 1000 meters length weigh one kg. Thus 50Nm means 50 hanks of 1000 meters i.e. 50x1000 meters length weigh one kg and 100Nm means 100 hanks of 1000 meters i.e. 100x1000 meters length weigh one kg.

    From above discussion it is concluded that higher the yarn number or yarn count finer the yarn and lower the number or count coarser the yarn.

    Most important conversion factors:

    • 1 yard = 0.9144 meter
    • 1 meter = 1.0936 yard
    • 1 meter = 39.37 inch
    • 1 cm = 0.3937 inch
    • 1inch = 2.54 cm
    • 1 m2 = 1.1960 yd2
    • 1 gm = 0.0353 oz
    • 1 oz = 28.350 gm
    • 1 lb (pound) = 453.6 gm
    • 1 lb = 0.4536 kg
    • 1 kg = 2.2046 lb (pound)
    • 1 m/kg - 0.4961 yd/lb 
    • 1 yd/lb = 2.0159 m/k

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    eBooks are essential for the students and professionals related to the study of Textile and Garments. But the eBooks are not available for free download from any website thus it is to be purchased spending money. Textile Aid is offering eBooks to the publishers who publishes at least one article in this blog.

    Your published articles will be read by numerous visitors across the glob and we will acknowledge you as the writer of the respective article. Please select your required eBooks from below list.

    Please go to Publish Article Page and get your required eBook.


    Book List of Textile Fiber:

    1. Bast and other Plant Fibers, Edited by Prof. J E Mcintyre

    2. Cotton: Science and Technology, Edited by S. Gordon and Y-L, Hsieh

    3. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E. R. Trotman

    4. Fiber Bragg Gratings by Raman Kashyap

    5. Physical Properties of Textile Fibers by W.E. Morton and J.W.S. Hearle

    6. Polymer Chemistry, Edited by Fred J. Davis

    7. Process of Fiber Formation by Zbigniew K. Walczak

    8. Smart Fibers, Fabric and Cloting, Edited by Xiaoming Tao

    9. Synthetic Fibers

    10. Textile Reference Book for Man Made Fibers by  Cesare Andreoli & Fabrizio Freti

    11. High Performance Fibers, Edited by J W S Hearle



    Book List of Yarn Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Textile Reference book for Spinning by Ezio Canssoni

    2. DRawframe

    3. Fundamentals of Spun Yarn Technology by Carl A. Lawrence



    Book List of Fabric Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Knitting Technology, David J Spencer

    2. Textile Reference Book for Knitting by Carmine Mazza Paola Zonda

    3. Fabric Structure and Design by N. Gokarneshan

    4. First Book of Modern Lace Knitting by Marianne Kinzel

    5. Handbook of Weaving by Sabit Adanur

    6. Handbook of Textile Design by Jacquie Wilson

    7. Textile Reference book for weaving by Giovanni Castelli

    8. Fabric Testing



    Book List of Dyeing and Printing Technology:

    1. Textile Printing, Edited by Leslie W C Miles

    2. Basic Principles of Textile Coloration by Arthur D Broadbent

    3. Color Space and Its Divisions by Rolf G. Kuehni

    4. Dyes and Pigment, Eidted by Arnold R. Lang

    5. Environmental Aspects of Textile Dyeing, Edited by R.M. Christie

    6. Industrial Dyes, Edited By Blaus Hunger

    7. Textile Dyes by Mansoor Iqbal

    8. The Chemistry of Dyeing by John K Wood

    9. Absorbent Technology by P.K. Chatterjee & B.S. Gupta

    10. Chemical Technology in the Pre-Treatment Processes of Textiles by S.R. Karmakar

    11. Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by G. Von. Geogievics

    12. Chemistry and Technology of Fabric Preparation & Finishing by Dr. Charles Tomasino

    13. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E.R. Trotman

    14. Encyclopedia of Textile Finishing by Prof.Dr. rer. nat. Hans-Karl Rouette

    15. Handbook of Detergents, Edited by Heinrich Waldhoff & Rudiger Spilker

    16. Textile Reference book for Finishing by Pietro Bellini

    17. Textile Processing with Enzymes, Edited by A. Cavaco-Paulo and G.M. Gubitz

    18. The Finishing of Textile Fabrics by Roberts Beamont

    19. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E. R. Trotman



    Book List of Apparel Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Advances in Carpet Manufacturing, Edited by K.K. Goswami

    2. Sewing Machines Operations Manual

    3. Innovation and Technology of Women's intimate apparels, Edited by W.Yu, J.Fan, S.C. Harlock and S.P.Ng

    4. Engineering apparel fabrics and garments, Edited By J.Fan and L.Hunter

    5. Fashion Drawing by John Hopkins

    6. Fashion Marketing, Edited by Mike Easey

    7. The Apparel Industry by Richard M. Jones



    Book List of Fashion Design:

    1. Figure Drawing For Fashion Design

    2. Fashion Drawing by John Hopkins



    Book List of Technical Textile:

    1. Handbook of Fiber optic data communication, Edited by Casimer Decusatis

    2. Military Textiles, Edited by Eugene Wilusz

    3. Non woven Fabrics, Edited by Wilhelm Albrecht, Hilmar Fuchs & Walter Kittelmann

    4. Textiles in automotive engineering by Walter Fung and Mike Hardcastle

    5. Composite Forming Technologies, Edited by A.C. Long

    6. Design and Manufacture of Textile Composites, Edited by A.C. Long

    7. Coated and Laminated Textiles by Walter Fung

    8. Handbook of Technical Textiles, Edited By A R Horrocks and S C Anand

    9. High Performance Fibers, Edited by J W S Hearle

    10. Recycling in Textiles, Edited by Youjiang Wang



    Book List of Textile Calculation:

    1. Textile Calculation by E.A. Posselet.


    Book List of Textile Glossary:

    1. Complete Textile Glossary

    2. Dye Glossary

    Textile and Garments eBook Download | Get Your Required eBook From Textile Aid

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

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    eBooks are essential for the students and professionals related to the study of Textile and Garments. But the eBooks are not available for free download from any website thus it is to be purchased spending money. Textile Aid is offering eBooks to the publishers who publishes at least one article in this blog.

    Your published articles will be read by numerous visitors across the glob and we will acknowledge you as the writer of the respective article. Please select your required eBooks from below list.

    Please go to Publish Article Page and get your required eBook.


    Book List of Textile Fiber:

    1. Bast and other Plant Fibers, Edited by Prof. J E Mcintyre

    2. Cotton: Science and Technology, Edited by S. Gordon and Y-L, Hsieh

    3. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E. R. Trotman

    4. Fiber Bragg Gratings by Raman Kashyap

    5. Physical Properties of Textile Fibers by W.E. Morton and J.W.S. Hearle

    6. Polymer Chemistry, Edited by Fred J. Davis

    7. Process of Fiber Formation by Zbigniew K. Walczak

    8. Smart Fibers, Fabric and Cloting, Edited by Xiaoming Tao

    9. Synthetic Fibers

    10. Textile Reference Book for Man Made Fibers by  Cesare Andreoli & Fabrizio Freti

    11. High Performance Fibers, Edited by J W S Hearle



    Book List of Yarn Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Textile Reference book for Spinning by Ezio Canssoni

    2. DRawframe

    3. Fundamentals of Spun Yarn Technology by Carl A. Lawrence



    Book List of Fabric Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Knitting Technology, David J Spencer

    2. Textile Reference Book for Knitting by Carmine Mazza Paola Zonda

    3. Fabric Structure and Design by N. Gokarneshan

    4. First Book of Modern Lace Knitting by Marianne Kinzel

    5. Handbook of Weaving by Sabit Adanur

    6. Handbook of Textile Design by Jacquie Wilson

    7. Textile Reference book for weaving by Giovanni Castelli

    8. Fabric Testing



    Book List of Dyeing and Printing Technology:

    1. Textile Printing, Edited by Leslie W C Miles

    2. Basic Principles of Textile Coloration by Arthur D Broadbent

    3. Color Space and Its Divisions by Rolf G. Kuehni

    4. Dyes and Pigment, Eidted by Arnold R. Lang

    5. Environmental Aspects of Textile Dyeing, Edited by R.M. Christie

    6. Industrial Dyes, Edited By Blaus Hunger

    7. Textile Dyes by Mansoor Iqbal

    8. The Chemistry of Dyeing by John K Wood

    9. Absorbent Technology by P.K. Chatterjee & B.S. Gupta

    10. Chemical Technology in the Pre-Treatment Processes of Textiles by S.R. Karmakar

    11. Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by G. Von. Geogievics

    12. Chemistry and Technology of Fabric Preparation & Finishing by Dr. Charles Tomasino

    13. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E.R. Trotman

    14. Encyclopedia of Textile Finishing by Prof.Dr. rer. nat. Hans-Karl Rouette

    15. Handbook of Detergents, Edited by Heinrich Waldhoff & Rudiger Spilker

    16. Textile Reference book for Finishing by Pietro Bellini

    17. Textile Processing with Enzymes, Edited by A. Cavaco-Paulo and G.M. Gubitz

    18. The Finishing of Textile Fabrics by Roberts Beamont

    19. Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers by E. R. Trotman



    Book List of Apparel Manufacturing Technology:

    1. Advances in Carpet Manufacturing, Edited by K.K. Goswami

    2. Sewing Machines Operations Manual

    3. Innovation and Technology of Women's intimate apparels, Edited by W.Yu, J.Fan, S.C. Harlock and S.P.Ng

    4. Engineering apparel fabrics and garments, Edited By J.Fan and L.Hunter

    5. Fashion Drawing by John Hopkins

    6. Fashion Marketing, Edited by Mike Easey

    7. The Apparel Industry by Richard M. Jones



    Book List of Fashion Design:

    1. Figure Drawing For Fashion Design

    2. Fashion Drawing by John Hopkins



    Book List of Technical Textile:

    1. Handbook of Fiber optic data communication, Edited by Casimer Decusatis

    2. Military Textiles, Edited by Eugene Wilusz

    3. Non woven Fabrics, Edited by Wilhelm Albrecht, Hilmar Fuchs & Walter Kittelmann

    4. Textiles in automotive engineering by Walter Fung and Mike Hardcastle

    5. Composite Forming Technologies, Edited by A.C. Long

    6. Design and Manufacture of Textile Composites, Edited by A.C. Long

    7. Coated and Laminated Textiles by Walter Fung

    8. Handbook of Technical Textiles, Edited By A R Horrocks and S C Anand

    9. High Performance Fibers, Edited by J W S Hearle

    10. Recycling in Textiles, Edited by Youjiang Wang



    Book List of Textile Calculation:

    1. Textile Calculation by E.A. Posselet.


    Book List of Textile Glossary:

    1. Complete Textile Glossary

    2. Dye Glossary

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    Polyester is one of the popular man made fiber which is used 49% in garment industries. Like 100% polyester made fabric, blended fabric like TC, CVC or TR are still famous in the current world.

    What is Polyester or Virgin Polyester?
     
    Polyester is a synthetic fiber that is synthesized from crude oil or petroleum products which are commonly known as ethylene glycol, dimethyl terepthalate and mostly from polyethylene terepthalate (PET) which is the most common class of plastic in the in the world. It is all around a polymerization process. It is used in clothing to reduce the price, make more durable, wrinkle free appearance, high strength and more resistant. The other advantages of polyester garments are easy to clean and dries quickly. But the garment made of polyester is not environment friendly and it is notorious for many reasons.

    The main reason that is harmful for environment is the production process of polyester fabric involves consumption of huge quantity water, chemicals, dyes and energy resources. Thus the water level is reduced, cause to increase the global temperature due to high energy requirement and discharging polluted chemical mixed water into the adjacent water bodies which is harmful for flora and fauna. Also the raw materials and their by products are toxic that pollutes the water and air which are the reason of many diseases.

    This artificial fabric is non biodegradable and also less comfort in comparison with cotton due to not presence of breath-ability.


    What is Recycled Polyester?
     
    Recycled polyesters are made from the plastic bottles that are used for water, juices, oils or soaps. Here, the main raw material is PET and after recycling it is known as rPET. In most of the plastic bottles we find a mark with he number "01" inside the triangular symbol for recycling along with the acronym "PET" below it. It means the PET can be recycled to produce further polyester material.



    The process of Polyester Recycling:
    • The collected PET bottles are sorted by color such as to make white polyester yarn separate transparent bottles and for blue separate the blue bottles.Then they are sterilized, dried and crushed into small chips passing trough a grinder.
    • The chips are then heated and dried to avoid any moisture. After that they are passed through a spinneret to form the filament of polyester fiber.
    • The filaments are then strengthen and wounded up in spools.
    • Need to give some texture on the filament is the next process which makes the fiber fluffy.
    • Then the filaments are dyed or colored.
    • Then they are baled and made ready for weaving and knitting.


     



    Sustainability of Recycled Polyester:

    The process Polyester Recycling requires less energy which is supposed to be 50-60% than the production process of virgin polyester. This is the huge difference between Recycled Polyester and Virgin Polyester. Also the consumption of water, chemical and dyes are very less for rPET. Also using rPET reduces the dependency on petroleum which is the main raw material of polyester. Converting the PET bottles into rPET reduces landfill and thus less soil contamination, air and water pollution.

    Since PET bottles are non biodegradable products the Recycling process gives a second life to the material. According to the NGO: Ocean Conservancy, 8 million metric tons of plastics enter into the ocean each year and on top of that the approximate 150 million metric tons are currently circulated in marine ecosystem. If it continues, by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. Plastic has been found 60% of all the sea birds and 100% to the turtles as they frequently mistake to take plastic as food. Thus, the thinking of sustainability to make rPET is very much required to save the whole environment and specially the marine ecosystem.

    The other benefits of Recycles Polyesters are the quality which is similar to the virgin polyester. The production process of rPET reduces 32% Carbon Dioxide(CO2) emission. According to the "Textile Exchange" , the PET can be recycled again and again without hampering its quality though recycling from blended polyester fabric is still a challenge. 100% polyester made fabric can be recycled without deteriorating its fiber quality.

    Also we should understand the recycling of polyester has its own limit whereas blended polyester more difficult and in some cases not possible to recycle them. People can think that plastics may be recycled again and again but each time plastics are heated thus the subsequent iteration of the polymer is degraded and the plastic must be used to make low quality product. Though recycled polyester takes almost 59% less energy than to produce virgin polyester but it still takes more energy than both organic and conventional cotton, hemp and wool.


    You Make Also Like: 


    Recylced Polyester (rPET) | Sustainability of Polyester Recycling

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

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    Polyester is one of the popular man made fiber which is used 49% in garment industries. Like 100% polyester made fabric, blended fabric like TC, CVC or TR are still famous in the current world.

    What is Polyester or Virgin Polyester?
     
    Polyester is a synthetic fiber that is synthesized from crude oil or petroleum products which are commonly known as ethylene glycol, dimethyl terepthalate and mostly from polyethylene terepthalate (PET) which is the most common class of plastic in the in the world. It is all around a polymerization process. It is used in clothing to reduce the price, make more durable, wrinkle free appearance, high strength and more resistant. The other advantages of polyester garments are easy to clean and dries quickly. But the garment made of polyester is not environment friendly and it is notorious for many reasons.

    The main reason that is harmful for environment is the production process of polyester fabric involves consumption of huge quantity water, chemicals, dyes and energy resources. Thus the water level is reduced, cause to increase the global temperature due to high energy requirement and discharging polluted chemical mixed water into the adjacent water bodies which is harmful for flora and fauna. Also the raw materials and their by products are toxic that pollutes the water and air which are the reason of many diseases.

    This artificial fabric is non biodegradable and also less comfort in comparison with cotton due to not presence of breath-ability.


    What is Recycled Polyester?
     
    Recycled polyesters are made from the plastic bottles that are used for water, juices, oils or soaps. Here, the main raw material is PET and after recycling it is known as rPET. In most of the plastic bottles we find a mark with he number "01" inside the triangular symbol for recycling along with the acronym "PET" below it. It means the PET can be recycled to produce further polyester material.



    The process of Polyester Recycling:
    • The collected PET bottles are sorted by color such as to make white polyester yarn separate transparent bottles and for blue separate the blue bottles.Then they are sterilized, dried and crushed into small chips passing trough a grinder.
    • The chips are then heated and dried to avoid any moisture. After that they are passed through a spinneret to form the filament of polyester fiber.
    • The filaments are then strengthen and wounded up in spools.
    • Need to give some texture on the filament is the next process which makes the fiber fluffy.
    • Then the filaments are dyed or colored.
    • Then they are baled and made ready for weaving and knitting.


     



    Sustainability of Recycled Polyester:

    The process Polyester Recycling requires less energy which is supposed to be 50-60% than the production process of virgin polyester. This is the huge difference between Recycled Polyester and Virgin Polyester. Also the consumption of water, chemical and dyes are very less for rPET. Also using rPET reduces the dependency on petroleum which is the main raw material of polyester. Converting the PET bottles into rPET reduces landfill and thus less soil contamination, air and water pollution.

    Since PET bottles are non biodegradable products the Recycling process gives a second life to the material. According to the NGO: Ocean Conservancy, 8 million metric tons of plastics enter into the ocean each year and on top of that the approximate 150 million metric tons are currently circulated in marine ecosystem. If it continues, by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. Plastic has been found 60% of all the sea birds and 100% to the turtles as they frequently mistake to take plastic as food. Thus, the thinking of sustainability to make rPET is very much required to save the whole environment and specially the marine ecosystem.

    The other benefits of Recycles Polyesters are the quality which is similar to the virgin polyester. The production process of rPET reduces 32% Carbon Dioxide(CO2) emission. According to the "Textile Exchange" , the PET can be recycled again and again without hampering its quality though recycling from blended polyester fabric is still a challenge. 100% polyester made fabric can be recycled without deteriorating its fiber quality.

    Also we should understand the recycling of polyester has its own limit whereas blended polyester more difficult and in some cases not possible to recycle them. People can think that plastics may be recycled again and again but each time plastics are heated thus the subsequent iteration of the polymer is degraded and the plastic must be used to make low quality product. Though recycled polyester takes almost 59% less energy than to produce virgin polyester but it still takes more energy than both organic and conventional cotton, hemp and wool.


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    In the sustainability context, recycle cotton is a popular topic with high interest of manufacturers, brands and retailers. For the entire supply chain of textile, recycled cotton can play a vital role to fulfill the goal of sustainability. Cotton is the most popular and comfortable fiber that is used around 56% of total fiber uses across the world. It has reliable quality performance as it is versatile, breathable and very comfortable to wear off.


    Conventional cotton harvesting involves use of large scale pesticides,, herbicides and fertilizers that cause to harm the whole environment. In addition, cotton harvesting and processing requires huge amount of water that is left as wastewater cause harm for aquatic lives. 

    For sustainable cotton harvesting there are some concept already exists like Organic Cotton( GOTS of OCS Certified cotton), Fairtrade cotton and Better Cotton (BCI). Besides the organic, Fairtrade and BCI cotton the new concept is recycled or regenerated cotton. It is not that much new as it was initiated in the beginning of 21st century and still continues with more and more research. 

    Recycled cotton prevents unnecessary wastage and can be a more sustainable alternative to disposal. It can come from secondhand clothing or from textile waste or leftovers which are eventually spun into new yarns and then fabric. It is also commonly referred to as regenerated cotton or reclaimed cotton. Basically the sources of cotton recycling are two types: Pre-consumer cotton and Post-consumer cotton.

     

    Pre-consumer cotton: Includes wastage in yarn production, fabric, garments cutting room or so on that are not used for any clothing

    Post-consumer Cotton: Includes used garments, upholstery, towels, household items.

    In fact, the largest share of the source is pre-consumer waste.




    Process of Cotton Recycling: It is all together mechanical recycling method. The wastes are collected and then sorted into colors as they are already dyed. After sorting, the fabrics or other kind of pre consumer wastages are run through  a machine that shreds them into yarn and further into raw fiber. This is a critical process and puts a great deal of strain on the fiber thus it becomes weaken and entangled during shredding.  


    The raw fibers is then spun into yarns for reuse in the other products. Since the quality will not be the same as original cotton thus it is spun with other fibers as blend. Most common blend happens with virgin cotton and polyester. The fiber length and uniformity will be impacted which leads to limit of the end use application.

    Use of Recycled Cotton:
    It is frequently blended with some other fibers to make fabric or other textiles, creating sustainable environmental friendly product. Recycled cotton can be used in industrial settings for polishing. It is popular to be made high quality paper with recycled cotton. The papers used for high command official purposes are mostly made of recycled cotton. It is also used for seat stuffing and automotive insulation in the industry of automobiles. Now Denim fabric mills are using recycle poly as a new concept under sustainable umbrella for the high interest of Brands and Retailers.

    Benefits of Cotton Recycling:
    • It can be used for insulation, rags of stuffing where it appears with new life cycle.
    • Recycling process prevent unwanted wastage that can divert many products from landfills. According to the Council for Textile Recycling, annual textile waste is estimated about 25 billion pounds.
    • Since it is already colored so after recycling further coloring is not required
    • The amount of energy, water and dyestuff use is reduced since recycled cotton yarns most commonly are sourced from pre-consumer textiles that are sorted by color.
    • Reduce the emission of CO2 and other fossil fuel.

    Challenges of Cotton Recycling:
    • Since Cotton becomes weaken during recycling it must be blended with other fibers to be produced new yarn with required strength and durability and therefore it can not recycled further.
    • Any amount of recycled product will impact the yarn and fabric properties such as length, strength, evenness and uniformity.
    • Cost is generally higher than the standard cotton processing
    • Test results are not that much good.
    • In a product not more than 30% recycled cotton can be used.
    • Consumer interest to buy recycled cotton product with higher price is less.

    After all, Cotton is a fiber that is naturally biodegradable, based on a study of North Carlina State University of USA, more that 75% cotton decomposed in soil within 273 days of dumping. So it is naturally a sustainable fiber all together. 


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    Recycled Cotton | Benefits and Challenges of Cotton Recycling

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

    Advertisements
    In the sustainability context, recycle cotton is a popular topic with high interest of manufacturers, brands and retailers. For the entire supply chain of textile, recycled cotton can play a vital role to fulfill the goal of sustainability. Cotton is the most popular and comfortable fiber that is used around 56% of total fiber uses across the world. It has reliable quality performance as it is versatile, breathable and very comfortable to wear off.


    Conventional cotton harvesting involves use of large scale pesticides,, herbicides and fertilizers that cause to harm the whole environment. In addition, cotton harvesting and processing requires huge amount of water that is left as wastewater cause harm for aquatic lives. 

    For sustainable cotton harvesting there are some concept already exists like Organic Cotton( GOTS of OCS Certified cotton), Fairtrade cotton and Better Cotton (BCI). Besides the organic, Fairtrade and BCI cotton the new concept is recycled or regenerated cotton. It is not that much new as it was initiated in the beginning of 21st century and still continues with more and more research. 

    Recycled cotton prevents unnecessary wastage and can be a more sustainable alternative to disposal. It can come from secondhand clothing or from textile waste or leftovers which are eventually spun into new yarns and then fabric. It is also commonly referred to as regenerated cotton or reclaimed cotton. Basically the sources of cotton recycling are two types: Pre-consumer cotton and Post-consumer cotton.

     

    Pre-consumer cotton: Includes wastage in yarn production, fabric, garments cutting room or so on that are not used for any clothing

    Post-consumer Cotton: Includes used garments, upholstery, towels, household items.

    In fact, the largest share of the source is pre-consumer waste.




    Process of Cotton Recycling: It is all together mechanical recycling method. The wastes are collected and then sorted into colors as they are already dyed. After sorting, the fabrics or other kind of pre consumer wastages are run through  a machine that shreds them into yarn and further into raw fiber. This is a critical process and puts a great deal of strain on the fiber thus it becomes weaken and entangled during shredding.  


    The raw fibers is then spun into yarns for reuse in the other products. Since the quality will not be the same as original cotton thus it is spun with other fibers as blend. Most common blend happens with virgin cotton and polyester. The fiber length and uniformity will be impacted which leads to limit of the end use application.

    Use of Recycled Cotton:
    It is frequently blended with some other fibers to make fabric or other textiles, creating sustainable environmental friendly product. Recycled cotton can be used in industrial settings for polishing. It is popular to be made high quality paper with recycled cotton. The papers used for high command official purposes are mostly made of recycled cotton. It is also used for seat stuffing and automotive insulation in the industry of automobiles. Now Denim fabric mills are using recycle poly as a new concept under sustainable umbrella for the high interest of Brands and Retailers.

    Benefits of Cotton Recycling:
    • It can be used for insulation, rags of stuffing where it appears with new life cycle.
    • Recycling process prevent unwanted wastage that can divert many products from landfills. According to the Council for Textile Recycling, annual textile waste is estimated about 25 billion pounds.
    • Since it is already colored so after recycling further coloring is not required
    • The amount of energy, water and dyestuff use is reduced since recycled cotton yarns most commonly are sourced from pre-consumer textiles that are sorted by color.
    • Reduce the emission of CO2 and other fossil fuel.

    Challenges of Cotton Recycling:
    • Since Cotton becomes weaken during recycling it must be blended with other fibers to be produced new yarn with required strength and durability and therefore it can not recycled further.
    • Any amount of recycled product will impact the yarn and fabric properties such as length, strength, evenness and uniformity.
    • Cost is generally higher than the standard cotton processing
    • Test results are not that much good.
    • In a product not more than 30% recycled cotton can be used.
    • Consumer interest to buy recycled cotton product with higher price is less.

    After all, Cotton is a fiber that is naturally biodegradable, based on a study of North Carlina State University of USA, more that 75% cotton decomposed in soil within 273 days of dumping. So it is naturally a sustainable fiber all together. 


    You May Also Like:

    Advertisements

    Denim is one of the most polluting industries among all textile departments. Now a day’s, technologists are continuously trying to invent environmental and production friendly manufacturing facilities to avoid traditional procedures. Despite the ecological facts are involved this particular industry is growing rapidly than any other. Behind the giant denim industry the big issues are the huge quantity of secondhand trash, unusable stock, denim waste, high-consumption of water, hazardous chemicals and energy.

    Denim is a dynamic, featuring field of fashion where the achievements of the science and new features of lifestyle are assumed in new styles. To understand the modern phenomenon of denim topic has to be accessed from different aspects. This field of fashion is rapidly growing business, thus continuous monitoring of the market is a must for all the professionals. 

    Denim is also one of the biggest employers in the world. It is giving work to a lots of people: stakeholders in the textile, garment and fashion industry including small and medium enterprises and large companies, designers and creative personnel of leading global fashion houses and emerging brands, actors of the retail sector as well as there are huge interest of machinery makers, workers and technologists of the weaving mill and so on.

    There is an effective cost saving aspect of sustainable denim project. In sustainability the uses of chemical and water are reduced along with energy reduction which is cost effective. For less chemical the extra cost is reducing and on the other hand less water gives less effluent which can help to save cost that involves in ETP management.

    A recent study has shown that sustainable product has good quality in comparison overall conventional product. As example, for aggressive washes, where many of processes are involved, the more number of processes the more number of rejections will be, also falling of tearing strength is another concern.

    The growing business of denim is becoming a threat to the environment and also unhygienic to the worker involved directly to washing. The uses of huge amount of water, hazardous chemicals and higher energy consumption are the key factors to deteriorate the condition of the environment. 

    According to the prospect of reducing consumption of water, chemicals & energy and also to reduce impact of worker sustainability in denim washing has come to light in the world trend. Many of the big retailers are selling sustainable denim in the world market which is becoming more popular in EU and US market gradually.

    To define sustainability we can say that this is the capability to maintain a certain process or state indefinitely. Sustainability has been expressed as meeting the need of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet human needs. 

    Using the minimal resources for denim production like changing procedures or reducing one or two steps and even by using alternative chemicals & new technology are commonly treated as sustainability in denim washing. Eventually, cost of denim production may reduce if less water and bio degradable chemicals are used which is only possible through sustainable concept.

     Reason of seeking sustainability:

    Global Aspects: Across the world 7.2 Billion Peoples in 2017 whereas 9 Billion people will be in 2050 or closer to that. To feed, give clothing and providing shelter for everyone does not come free. Everything has a cost. This cost to be brought by the environment.

    According to total textile exchange, about 20% of industrial fresh water pollution comes from textile treatment and dyeing.

    About 2700 liter of fresh water is used to make one cotton T-shirt. About 920 gallons water is used to make one jeans. Other textile products also consume huge amounts of energy and water in processing and finishing.

    1 trillion kwh used by the global textile industry. This equals approximate 10% of global carbon impact.


    Aspects of Bangladesh: It is estimated that in Bangladesh approximately 719 wet processing facilities including knit fabric dyeing and denim washing factories consume around 750 billion litres of groundwater annually. While in Bangladesh there are factories which are top of class, there are also indications of water consumption levels of 300 litres per kg of fabric – a figure which is approximately 3 times higher than the global average. 

    High water consumption also comes with relatively high energy consumption, heating more water than strictly required in the dyeing process. This contributes to a set of water-related challenges, Bangladesh is also facing severe energy shortages. The country produces only about ¾ of its energy needs, requiring many fabric and garment manufacturers to generate their own. 

    According to a study conducted by BUET (Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology) that was published in The Dailystar the Textile Industries would be dumping 20,300 crore liters of untreated wastewater into the countries water bodies every year from 2021 if the present situation goin on. Thus the pollution would be threatening fisheries, biodiversity and groundwater. 

    The untreated effluents could instigate quick changes in the aquatic ecosystems and may affect the life of fisheries. The water bodies might face increase of temperature due to warm wastewater that discharges into them and cause to high impact on flora and fauna. Dhaka, Narayanganj and Gazipur belt of textile industries are major deliver of the wastewater to the nearly waterbodies. Referring to another study, it said textile industries near the Shitalakkhya river discharge their untreated dye with heavy metals into the river. 

    To meet the export value $50 billion by 2021 the manufacturers are intended to enlarge their business volume that eventually impacts on high discharge of wastewater.According to the Bangladesh Environment Conservation Act, 1995 the textile dyeing and washing industries are in "Red Category Industry", that are treated as most polluting. 

    There is stringent rule by the Department of Environment that ETP is must to run any wet processing facility but many of the factories are yet to install the waste water treatment plant as running the ETP is expensive, approximately tk 20-35 crore needs to install an ETP plant. Both chemical and biological ETP (Effluent Treatment Plant) is mandatory and it has to be functional as well.


    With this realization of need to have sustainable products and looking at huge impact of  textile industry on the environment – of which denim is the vital portion – the natural way forward is only devising new products, ways and processes which can help in reducing the environmental footprint of textiles. 

    The main three pillars of the concept of Sustainable Denim Production are -

    • Environmental
    • Social
    • Economical

    Taking this in consideration there are some methods, processes and technology are being applied to reduce the impact and to make sustainable Denim product. Some of them are as follows:

    • Single bath method
    • Ensure front loading machines that consume less whater
    • Equip laundry with modern washing machinery that enables to wash denim at low M:L ratio
    • Use water meter to 100% washing machine
    • Use EIM which is powered by Jeanologia
    • Ozone Fading
    • Use of green chemical
    • Ice blasting
    • Use of laser
    • Install functional chemical and biological ETP

    You May Also like:



    Sustainable Denim Washing | Reason Behind Seeking Sustainable Denim Production

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

    Advertisements
    Denim is one of the most polluting industries among all textile departments. Now a day’s, technologists are continuously trying to invent environmental and production friendly manufacturing facilities to avoid traditional procedures. Despite the ecological facts are involved this particular industry is growing rapidly than any other. Behind the giant denim industry the big issues are the huge quantity of secondhand trash, unusable stock, denim waste, high-consumption of water, hazardous chemicals and energy.

    Denim is a dynamic, featuring field of fashion where the achievements of the science and new features of lifestyle are assumed in new styles. To understand the modern phenomenon of denim topic has to be accessed from different aspects. This field of fashion is rapidly growing business, thus continuous monitoring of the market is a must for all the professionals. 

    Denim is also one of the biggest employers in the world. It is giving work to a lots of people: stakeholders in the textile, garment and fashion industry including small and medium enterprises and large companies, designers and creative personnel of leading global fashion houses and emerging brands, actors of the retail sector as well as there are huge interest of machinery makers, workers and technologists of the weaving mill and so on.

    There is an effective cost saving aspect of sustainable denim project. In sustainability the uses of chemical and water are reduced along with energy reduction which is cost effective. For less chemical the extra cost is reducing and on the other hand less water gives less effluent which can help to save cost that involves in ETP management.

    A recent study has shown that sustainable product has good quality in comparison overall conventional product. As example, for aggressive washes, where many of processes are involved, the more number of processes the more number of rejections will be, also falling of tearing strength is another concern.

    The growing business of denim is becoming a threat to the environment and also unhygienic to the worker involved directly to washing. The uses of huge amount of water, hazardous chemicals and higher energy consumption are the key factors to deteriorate the condition of the environment. 

    According to the prospect of reducing consumption of water, chemicals & energy and also to reduce impact of worker sustainability in denim washing has come to light in the world trend. Many of the big retailers are selling sustainable denim in the world market which is becoming more popular in EU and US market gradually.

    To define sustainability we can say that this is the capability to maintain a certain process or state indefinitely. Sustainability has been expressed as meeting the need of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet human needs. 

    Using the minimal resources for denim production like changing procedures or reducing one or two steps and even by using alternative chemicals & new technology are commonly treated as sustainability in denim washing. Eventually, cost of denim production may reduce if less water and bio degradable chemicals are used which is only possible through sustainable concept.

     Reason of seeking sustainability:

    Global Aspects: Across the world 7.2 Billion Peoples in 2017 whereas 9 Billion people will be in 2050 or closer to that. To feed, give clothing and providing shelter for everyone does not come free. Everything has a cost. This cost to be brought by the environment.

    According to total textile exchange, about 20% of industrial fresh water pollution comes from textile treatment and dyeing.

    About 2700 liter of fresh water is used to make one cotton T-shirt. About 920 gallons water is used to make one jeans. Other textile products also consume huge amounts of energy and water in processing and finishing.

    1 trillion kwh used by the global textile industry. This equals approximate 10% of global carbon impact.


    Aspects of Bangladesh: It is estimated that in Bangladesh approximately 719 wet processing facilities including knit fabric dyeing and denim washing factories consume around 750 billion litres of groundwater annually. While in Bangladesh there are factories which are top of class, there are also indications of water consumption levels of 300 litres per kg of fabric – a figure which is approximately 3 times higher than the global average. 

    High water consumption also comes with relatively high energy consumption, heating more water than strictly required in the dyeing process. This contributes to a set of water-related challenges, Bangladesh is also facing severe energy shortages. The country produces only about ¾ of its energy needs, requiring many fabric and garment manufacturers to generate their own. 

    According to a study conducted by BUET (Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology) that was published in The Dailystar the Textile Industries would be dumping 20,300 crore liters of untreated wastewater into the countries water bodies every year from 2021 if the present situation goin on. Thus the pollution would be threatening fisheries, biodiversity and groundwater. 

    The untreated effluents could instigate quick changes in the aquatic ecosystems and may affect the life of fisheries. The water bodies might face increase of temperature due to warm wastewater that discharges into them and cause to high impact on flora and fauna. Dhaka, Narayanganj and Gazipur belt of textile industries are major deliver of the wastewater to the nearly waterbodies. Referring to another study, it said textile industries near the Shitalakkhya river discharge their untreated dye with heavy metals into the river. 

    To meet the export value $50 billion by 2021 the manufacturers are intended to enlarge their business volume that eventually impacts on high discharge of wastewater.According to the Bangladesh Environment Conservation Act, 1995 the textile dyeing and washing industries are in "Red Category Industry", that are treated as most polluting. 

    There is stringent rule by the Department of Environment that ETP is must to run any wet processing facility but many of the factories are yet to install the waste water treatment plant as running the ETP is expensive, approximately tk 20-35 crore needs to install an ETP plant. Both chemical and biological ETP (Effluent Treatment Plant) is mandatory and it has to be functional as well.


    With this realization of need to have sustainable products and looking at huge impact of  textile industry on the environment – of which denim is the vital portion – the natural way forward is only devising new products, ways and processes which can help in reducing the environmental footprint of textiles. 

    The main three pillars of the concept of Sustainable Denim Production are -

    • Environmental
    • Social
    • Economical

    Taking this in consideration there are some methods, processes and technology are being applied to reduce the impact and to make sustainable Denim product. Some of them are as follows:

    • Single bath method
    • Ensure front loading machines that consume less whater
    • Equip laundry with modern washing machinery that enables to wash denim at low M:L ratio
    • Use water meter to 100% washing machine
    • Use EIM which is powered by Jeanologia
    • Ozone Fading
    • Use of green chemical
    • Ice blasting
    • Use of laser
    • Install functional chemical and biological ETP

    You May Also like:



    Advertisements

    Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) is a non-profit organizations aims to make global cotton production better for the people who produce it, better for the environment and better for the sectors future. Goal of BCI is aligned to the goals of SDGs as it embraces the SDGs and is inspired to be part of a global community working to make the world a better place. The Better Cotton Standard System covers the main three elements of sustainability : Environmental, social and economic. Each of the elements from the principles and criteria to the monitoring mechanisms which show results and impact - work together to support the better cotton standard system.


    BCI standard was initiated in the year 2005 and was recognized by GAP INC, Organic Exchange(Textile Exchange), H&M, ICCO, IFAP, IFC, IKEA, Oxfam, PAN UK and WWF.

    BCI is the largest cotton sustainability programme in the globe. It has 1.3 millions licensed farmers in 21 countries to whom BCI and its partners provide training on more sustainable agricultural practices.








    BCI supports the farmers to improve the poor environmental management and working conditions to produce cotton.Licensed BCI Farmers produce cotton in a way that care for the environment, minimizing the negative effects of fertilizers and pesticides and caring for water, soil health and natural habitats. BCI farmers also commit to decent work principles - conditions that support workers safety and well being.

    BCI Farmers produced 3.3 million metric tonnes of BCI cotton in the 2016-17 which is enough to make 2.5 billion pairs of Jeans. Currently Better cotton accounts for 14% of global cotton production which is included the three BCI recognized equivalent Standards: CmiA(Africa), MyBMP(Australia) and ABR(Brazil).

    SO far BCI has 1197 members spanning the cotton supply chain, 85 brands and retailers, 1039 suppliers and manufacturers, 32 producers organizations, 31 civil society member and 12 associate members.



    Besides BCI, organic (GOTS & OCS) Fairtrade, myBMP(Australia), ABR(Brazil), Aid by Trade Foundation and some others work towards ensuring sustainable cotton production.








    Principles and Criteria:

    Betters cotton standard works based on seven important principles what their licensed farmers responsible to do:
    • minimize the harmful impact of crop protection practices
    • promote water stewardship
    • care for the health of the soil
    • enhance biodiversity and use land responsibly
    • care for and preserve fibre quality
    • promote decent work
    • operate an effective management system


    Assurance Programme:

    The Better Cotton Assurance Programme is a key component of the Better Cotton Standard System. It involves farmers participating in a continuous cycle of learning and improvement, and is the central mechanism for assessing whether farmers can grow and sell Better Cotton.

    Chain of Custody(CoC):

    The Better Cotton Chain of Custody (CoC) is the key framework that connects demand with supply of Better Cotton and helps to incentivize cotton farmers to adopt more sustainable practices.

    The CoC refers to the chronological documentation, paper trail and electronic evidence that relates to the movement of Better Cotton products through the supply chain. This ensures the volume of Better Cotton claimed by BCI Retailer and Brand Members does not exceed the volume of Better Cotton produced by licensed BCI Farmers in any given time period, accounting for conversion rates.

    Better Cotton Claims Framework:

    It provides support to BCI members to make credible and positive claims about Better Cotton. This Claims Framework is is governed by the BCI Code of Practice, BCI Terms of Membership, and BCI Monitoring Protocol.

    Outcome and Impact:

    BCI standard is stringent to their commitments to measuring sustainability improvements everywhere of the cotton production. It has a aim of achieving 30% cotton will be produced in the way of BCI whereas currently it upholds 14% of the total amount produced. BCI standard works based on result indicator date which measure quantitatively differences between incensed BCI Farmers and non BCI Farmers in the same Geographical area.



    Funding:
    BCI Organization receives funding from three sources: earned income for services delivered; grants and donations from private and public funders; and volume-based fees and funding from brands. \

    You May Also Like:



    Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) | Sustainable Cotton Production Standard

    Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

    Advertisements
    Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) is a non-profit organizations aims to make global cotton production better for the people who produce it, better for the environment and better for the sectors future. Goal of BCI is aligned to the goals of SDGs as it embraces the SDGs and is inspired to be part of a global community working to make the world a better place. The Better Cotton Standard System covers the main three elements of sustainability : Environmental, social and economic. Each of the elements from the principles and criteria to the monitoring mechanisms which show results and impact - work together to support the better cotton standard system.


    BCI standard was initiated in the year 2005 and was recognized by GAP INC, Organic Exchange(Textile Exchange), H&M, ICCO, IFAP, IFC, IKEA, Oxfam, PAN UK and WWF.

    BCI is the largest cotton sustainability programme in the globe. It has 1.3 millions licensed farmers in 21 countries to whom BCI and its partners provide training on more sustainable agricultural practices.








    BCI supports the farmers to improve the poor environmental management and working conditions to produce cotton.Licensed BCI Farmers produce cotton in a way that care for the environment, minimizing the negative effects of fertilizers and pesticides and caring for water, soil health and natural habitats. BCI farmers also commit to decent work principles - conditions that support workers safety and well being.

    BCI Farmers produced 3.3 million metric tonnes of BCI cotton in the 2016-17 which is enough to make 2.5 billion pairs of Jeans. Currently Better cotton accounts for 14% of global cotton production which is included the three BCI recognized equivalent Standards: CmiA(Africa), MyBMP(Australia) and ABR(Brazil).

    SO far BCI has 1197 members spanning the cotton supply chain, 85 brands and retailers, 1039 suppliers and manufacturers, 32 producers organizations, 31 civil society member and 12 associate members.



    Besides BCI, organic (GOTS & OCS) Fairtrade, myBMP(Australia), ABR(Brazil), Aid by Trade Foundation and some others work towards ensuring sustainable cotton production.








    Principles and Criteria:

    Betters cotton standard works based on seven important principles what their licensed farmers responsible to do:
    • minimize the harmful impact of crop protection practices
    • promote water stewardship
    • care for the health of the soil
    • enhance biodiversity and use land responsibly
    • care for and preserve fibre quality
    • promote decent work
    • operate an effective management system


    Assurance Programme:

    The Better Cotton Assurance Programme is a key component of the Better Cotton Standard System. It involves farmers participating in a continuous cycle of learning and improvement, and is the central mechanism for assessing whether farmers can grow and sell Better Cotton.

    Chain of Custody(CoC):

    The Better Cotton Chain of Custody (CoC) is the key framework that connects demand with supply of Better Cotton and helps to incentivize cotton farmers to adopt more sustainable practices.

    The CoC refers to the chronological documentation, paper trail and electronic evidence that relates to the movement of Better Cotton products through the supply chain. This ensures the volume of Better Cotton claimed by BCI Retailer and Brand Members does not exceed the volume of Better Cotton produced by licensed BCI Farmers in any given time period, accounting for conversion rates.

    Better Cotton Claims Framework:

    It provides support to BCI members to make credible and positive claims about Better Cotton. This Claims Framework is is governed by the BCI Code of Practice, BCI Terms of Membership, and BCI Monitoring Protocol.

    Outcome and Impact:

    BCI standard is stringent to their commitments to measuring sustainability improvements everywhere of the cotton production. It has a aim of achieving 30% cotton will be produced in the way of BCI whereas currently it upholds 14% of the total amount produced. BCI standard works based on result indicator date which measure quantitatively differences between incensed BCI Farmers and non BCI Farmers in the same Geographical area.



    Funding:
    BCI Organization receives funding from three sources: earned income for services delivered; grants and donations from private and public funders; and volume-based fees and funding from brands. \

    You May Also Like:



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