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Knit fabrics are usually measured in kilogram whereas it is related to GSM as well. Knit fashion is now popular in the world market. Knit merchandising is not so easy thing whatever consumption is one of the key factor for knit merchandising. T-shirts, pull over, polo-shirt (long sleeve or short sleeve) are treated as knit top garments as well as trouser and pant are treated as knit bottom garments.


Consumption formula for any TOP knit Garments


 

(Measurement in CM)

(B.L + S.L. + Allowance) X 1/2 Chest X 2 X GSM X 12 ÷ (10000 X 1000) kg/dz   

Here, 
B.L - Body Length
S.L - Sleeve Length
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for both B.L and S.L
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
10000 means cm is converted into meter
1000  means gram is converted into kg

(Measurement in INCH)

(B.L + S.L. + Allowance) X 1/2 Chest X 2 X GSM X 12 ÷ (1550X 1000) kg/dz   

Here
B.L - Body Length
S.L - Sleeve Length
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for both B.L and S.L
1550 means inch is converted into meter (1 inch = 39.37" where inch square will be 39.37"X39.37")
1000  means gram is converted into kg


Consumption Formula for any Bottom Knit Garments



(Measurement in CM)

(Inseam + B.R + W.B + Allowances) X (1/2 Thai Circular + Allowances) X 4 X GSM X 12 ÷ (10000X 1000) kg/dz

Here, 
B.R - Back Rise
W.B -Waist Band
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for Inseam, B.R & W.B
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
10000 means cm is converted into meter
1000  means gram is converted into kg

(Measurement in CM)

(Inseam + B.R + W.B + Allowances) X (1/2 Thai Circular + Allowances) X 4 X GSM X 12 ÷ (1550X 1000) kg/dz

Here, 
B.R - Back Rise
W.B -Waist Band
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for Inseam, B.R & W.B
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
1550 means inch is converted into meter (1 inch = 39.37" where inch square will be 39.37"X39.37")
1000  means gram is converted into kg

Normally 
American Buyers Follow Measurement in Inch
European Buyers Follow Measurement in CM

I think you will enable to perform any knit garments consumption through the above formulas. If anybody requires example of relevant field please contact with me.

Knit Garments Consumption Formula | Knit Top and Bottom Consumption

Posted by Firoz Kabir 3 comments

Knit fabrics are usually measured in kilogram whereas it is related to GSM as well. Knit fashion is now popular in the world market. Knit merchandising is not so easy thing whatever consumption is one of the key factor for knit merchandising. T-shirts, pull over, polo-shirt (long sleeve or short sleeve) are treated as knit top garments as well as trouser and pant are treated as knit bottom garments.


Consumption formula for any TOP knit Garments


 

(Measurement in CM)

(B.L + S.L. + Allowance) X 1/2 Chest X 2 X GSM X 12 ÷ (10000 X 1000) kg/dz   

Here, 
B.L - Body Length
S.L - Sleeve Length
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for both B.L and S.L
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
10000 means cm is converted into meter
1000  means gram is converted into kg

(Measurement in INCH)

(B.L + S.L. + Allowance) X 1/2 Chest X 2 X GSM X 12 ÷ (1550X 1000) kg/dz   

Here
B.L - Body Length
S.L - Sleeve Length
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for both B.L and S.L
1550 means inch is converted into meter (1 inch = 39.37" where inch square will be 39.37"X39.37")
1000  means gram is converted into kg


Consumption Formula for any Bottom Knit Garments



(Measurement in CM)

(Inseam + B.R + W.B + Allowances) X (1/2 Thai Circular + Allowances) X 4 X GSM X 12 ÷ (10000X 1000) kg/dz

Here, 
B.R - Back Rise
W.B -Waist Band
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for Inseam, B.R & W.B
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
10000 means cm is converted into meter
1000  means gram is converted into kg

(Measurement in CM)

(Inseam + B.R + W.B + Allowances) X (1/2 Thai Circular + Allowances) X 4 X GSM X 12 ÷ (1550X 1000) kg/dz

Here, 
B.R - Back Rise
W.B -Waist Band
Allowance - Allowance would have considered for Inseam, B.R & W.B
GSM - Gram Per Square Meter
1550 means inch is converted into meter (1 inch = 39.37" where inch square will be 39.37"X39.37")
1000  means gram is converted into kg

Normally 
American Buyers Follow Measurement in Inch
European Buyers Follow Measurement in CM

I think you will enable to perform any knit garments consumption through the above formulas. If anybody requires example of relevant field please contact with me.

3 comments:

Yarn counting or numbering system is the universal numerical expression for measuring yarn and thread coarseness or fineness. We can use count for both thread and yarn. Thread and yarn is not similar to use. They are also different in construction. Normally yarns are used to weaving and may be plied or single whereas thread is frequently used for sewing purposes and always contain two or more plies. When we use thread for garments sewing we frequently see that thread suppliers mention thread ticket number as well as count. Since thread is made always by two or more plies of yarn therefore counting system of thread is not similar like normal yarn count.



Thread Numbering or Counting:
When we will use counting system of thread like as 27 tex, 40 tex, 60 tex, 80 tex (Tex), it is simply followed the tex numbering system.

For direct system of thread numbering Tex is very popular. Tex is defined as weight of 1000 meters thread in grams.
For example, Tex 60 – a length of 1000 meters of thread will gives 60 grams of weight.

When we use 20/2, 20/3, 20/4 or 40/2 (English Count) then we can find out the resultant count by calculating the resultant count.

When more than one ply of yarn is twisted into a thread, finding the resultant size of the thread by considering all the plies becomes necessary.

For Indirect Counting System or Fixed Weight System: Resultant size = Individual yarn count / Number of plies

For Direct Counting System  In fixed length systems: Resultant size = Individual yarn count x Number of plies
In case of sewing necessary if you need thread of any count then a  particular resultant size can be made with any number of plies.

Ticket Numbering
Suppliers may ask you about the ticket number you want to purchase then you have to provide the ticket numbers of desired thread.Ticket numbering is a commercial numbering system. Ticket numbers are merely the manufacturer’s reference numbers for the size of a given thread.
The Metric Count, Cotton Count and Denier Systems use ticket numbering system to give an easy approximation of the specific size of the finished thread.

Depends on the nature of fiber as well as thread making process, ticket numbers will vary as it is not the same as in another.  For example, Ticket 75 Cotton is not the same as Ticket 75 mono-filament thread.

For Tex Ticket Numbering:
To convert any Tex Number to a Ticket Number value: divide 1,000 by the Tex number and multiply by 3.  [ Tkt. = (1000/Tex No.) X 3 ]



For Metric Ticket Numbering:


They can simply denote:
Higher the ticket number, finer the thread.
Lower the ticket number, coarser the thread.

What is Thread Ticket Number | Garments Sewing Thread Numbering Systems

Posted by Firoz Kabir 6 comments

Yarn counting or numbering system is the universal numerical expression for measuring yarn and thread coarseness or fineness. We can use count for both thread and yarn. Thread and yarn is not similar to use. They are also different in construction. Normally yarns are used to weaving and may be plied or single whereas thread is frequently used for sewing purposes and always contain two or more plies. When we use thread for garments sewing we frequently see that thread suppliers mention thread ticket number as well as count. Since thread is made always by two or more plies of yarn therefore counting system of thread is not similar like normal yarn count.



Thread Numbering or Counting:
When we will use counting system of thread like as 27 tex, 40 tex, 60 tex, 80 tex (Tex), it is simply followed the tex numbering system.

For direct system of thread numbering Tex is very popular. Tex is defined as weight of 1000 meters thread in grams.
For example, Tex 60 – a length of 1000 meters of thread will gives 60 grams of weight.

When we use 20/2, 20/3, 20/4 or 40/2 (English Count) then we can find out the resultant count by calculating the resultant count.

When more than one ply of yarn is twisted into a thread, finding the resultant size of the thread by considering all the plies becomes necessary.

For Indirect Counting System or Fixed Weight System: Resultant size = Individual yarn count / Number of plies

For Direct Counting System  In fixed length systems: Resultant size = Individual yarn count x Number of plies
In case of sewing necessary if you need thread of any count then a  particular resultant size can be made with any number of plies.

Ticket Numbering
Suppliers may ask you about the ticket number you want to purchase then you have to provide the ticket numbers of desired thread.Ticket numbering is a commercial numbering system. Ticket numbers are merely the manufacturer’s reference numbers for the size of a given thread.
The Metric Count, Cotton Count and Denier Systems use ticket numbering system to give an easy approximation of the specific size of the finished thread.

Depends on the nature of fiber as well as thread making process, ticket numbers will vary as it is not the same as in another.  For example, Ticket 75 Cotton is not the same as Ticket 75 mono-filament thread.

For Tex Ticket Numbering:
To convert any Tex Number to a Ticket Number value: divide 1,000 by the Tex number and multiply by 3.  [ Tkt. = (1000/Tex No.) X 3 ]



For Metric Ticket Numbering:


They can simply denote:
Higher the ticket number, finer the thread.
Lower the ticket number, coarser the thread.

6 comments:

Lining: Lining is a fabric other than shell fabric generally used in jacket, coat, overcoat or trouser. For making warm cloth lining is used under main fabric in a garment. Usually knitted fabrics are used as lining to make Jeans, polyester blended linings are used to coat or overcoat. Single jersey, Double jersey, Fleece or Sherpa is used as lining which are attached with shell fabric through stitching.










Padding: Padding is another kind of fabric used in middle part of jacket, overcoat  as well as coat. Polyester made padding is of low ounce generally used between shell fabric and lining part of these garments.












Shell Fabric: The fabric which is used as main fabrication in lining or padding containing cloth are known as shell fabric. Denim fabrics are frequently used as shell fabric in case of denim jacket or jeans trousers. For overcoat and coat, the blended high quality fabrics comparatively costly than other fabric like as lining or padding are used as shell fabric.










Sherpa: Sherpa material is a kind of fabric made of 70% acrylic and 30% polyester. Sherpa lining is a nubby, soft pile material and provides a lot of warmth. The jackets made with Sherpa have Sherpa insulation in the body covered with nylon quilt lining in the sleeves.

What is Lining, Padding, Sherpa and Shell Fabric?

Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

Lining: Lining is a fabric other than shell fabric generally used in jacket, coat, overcoat or trouser. For making warm cloth lining is used under main fabric in a garment. Usually knitted fabrics are used as lining to make Jeans, polyester blended linings are used to coat or overcoat. Single jersey, Double jersey, Fleece or Sherpa is used as lining which are attached with shell fabric through stitching.










Padding: Padding is another kind of fabric used in middle part of jacket, overcoat  as well as coat. Polyester made padding is of low ounce generally used between shell fabric and lining part of these garments.












Shell Fabric: The fabric which is used as main fabrication in lining or padding containing cloth are known as shell fabric. Denim fabrics are frequently used as shell fabric in case of denim jacket or jeans trousers. For overcoat and coat, the blended high quality fabrics comparatively costly than other fabric like as lining or padding are used as shell fabric.










Sherpa: Sherpa material is a kind of fabric made of 70% acrylic and 30% polyester. Sherpa lining is a nubby, soft pile material and provides a lot of warmth. The jackets made with Sherpa have Sherpa insulation in the body covered with nylon quilt lining in the sleeves.

0 comments:

In a word TEXTILE means cloth or to weave. If you think it as a broad sense you would find that it is the combination six differential parts where one is related to another. Garment / cloth is the final product of textile, where each and every step has to be followed some successive processes. From fiber to cloth the whole process is basically run through four main steps as spinning, weaving or knitting, dyeing or printing and garments making. Now I have shared the below process flowcharts for any textile students or readers as to know about the significant and consecutive process of textile.

PROCESS FLOWCHART OF TEXTILE AT A GLANCE


TEXTILE FIBERS    -------     YARN MANUFACTURING     -------      YARN

         YARN    -------     FABRIC MANUFACTURING    -------    GREY FABRICS

GREY FABRICS     -------      WET PROCESSING    -------     FINISHED FABRICS

FINISHED FABRICS   --------    GARMENTS MANUFACTURING    --------    GARMENTS


FLOW CHART OF SPINNING

  BLOW-ROOM

CARDING

DRAWING

LAP FORMING

COMBING

DRAWING

ROVING

RING SPINNING



FLOW CHART OF WEAVING

YARN FROM SPINNING

DOUBLING AND TWISTING

WINDING

CREELING

WARPING

SIZING
DRAWING-IN AND DENTING

LOOMING

LTYING-IN

WEAVING

 

FLOW CHART OF KNITTING

YARN IN CONE FORM

CREELING

FEEDING THE YARN IN THE FEEDER

KNITTING

WITHDRAWING THE ROLLED FABRIC

INSPECTION
NUMBERING

DISPATCHING

FLOW CHART OF DYEING (WOVEN FABRIC)

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

STITCHING

CROPPING

BRUSHING

SINGEING

DESIZING

SCOURING

BLEACHING

SOURING

WASHING

DRYING

MERCERIZING

DYEING

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING

 

FLOW CHART OF DYEING (KNIT DYEING)

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

BATCHING

STITCHING

LOAD ON MACHINE

SCOURING

BLEACHING

ENZYME TREATMENT

LEVELING

ELECTROLITING

DYEING

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING

FLOW CHART OF PRINTING

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

STITCHING

CROPPING

BRUSHING

SINGEING

DESIZING

SCOURING

BLEACHING

SOURING

WASHING

DRYING

MERCERIZING

PRINTING 

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING


FLOW CHART OF GARMENT MANUFACTURING

TECH PACK/ SKETCH

BLOCK PATTERN FROM BUYER

PATTERN MAKING

SAMPLE MAKING

GARMENTS PATTERN

GRADING

MARKER MAKING

SPREADING

CUTTING

SORTING & BUNDLING
EMBROIDERY/PRINTING

STITCHING

INSPECTION
WASHING
FINISHING

IRONING

FINAL INSPECTION
FOLDING

PACKING

DISPATCH


Process Flowchart of Spinning, Weaving, Knitting, Dyeing, Printing and Garments Making

Posted by Firoz Kabir 1 comment

In a word TEXTILE means cloth or to weave. If you think it as a broad sense you would find that it is the combination six differential parts where one is related to another. Garment / cloth is the final product of textile, where each and every step has to be followed some successive processes. From fiber to cloth the whole process is basically run through four main steps as spinning, weaving or knitting, dyeing or printing and garments making. Now I have shared the below process flowcharts for any textile students or readers as to know about the significant and consecutive process of textile.

PROCESS FLOWCHART OF TEXTILE AT A GLANCE


TEXTILE FIBERS    -------     YARN MANUFACTURING     -------      YARN

         YARN    -------     FABRIC MANUFACTURING    -------    GREY FABRICS

GREY FABRICS     -------      WET PROCESSING    -------     FINISHED FABRICS

FINISHED FABRICS   --------    GARMENTS MANUFACTURING    --------    GARMENTS


FLOW CHART OF SPINNING

  BLOW-ROOM

CARDING

DRAWING

LAP FORMING

COMBING

DRAWING

ROVING

RING SPINNING



FLOW CHART OF WEAVING

YARN FROM SPINNING

DOUBLING AND TWISTING

WINDING

CREELING

WARPING

SIZING
DRAWING-IN AND DENTING

LOOMING

LTYING-IN

WEAVING

 

FLOW CHART OF KNITTING

YARN IN CONE FORM

CREELING

FEEDING THE YARN IN THE FEEDER

KNITTING

WITHDRAWING THE ROLLED FABRIC

INSPECTION
NUMBERING

DISPATCHING

FLOW CHART OF DYEING (WOVEN FABRIC)

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

STITCHING

CROPPING

BRUSHING

SINGEING

DESIZING

SCOURING

BLEACHING

SOURING

WASHING

DRYING

MERCERIZING

DYEING

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING

 

FLOW CHART OF DYEING (KNIT DYEING)

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

BATCHING

STITCHING

LOAD ON MACHINE

SCOURING

BLEACHING

ENZYME TREATMENT

LEVELING

ELECTROLITING

DYEING

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING

FLOW CHART OF PRINTING

GREY FABRIC INSPECTION

STITCHING

CROPPING

BRUSHING

SINGEING

DESIZING

SCOURING

BLEACHING

SOURING

WASHING

DRYING

MERCERIZING

PRINTING 

AFTERTREATMENT

FINISHING

INSPECTION

PACKING

BALING


FLOW CHART OF GARMENT MANUFACTURING

TECH PACK/ SKETCH

BLOCK PATTERN FROM BUYER

PATTERN MAKING

SAMPLE MAKING

GARMENTS PATTERN

GRADING

MARKER MAKING

SPREADING

CUTTING

SORTING & BUNDLING
EMBROIDERY/PRINTING

STITCHING

INSPECTION
WASHING
FINISHING

IRONING

FINAL INSPECTION
FOLDING

PACKING

DISPATCH


1 comments:

Count: Yarns  as well as threads are expressed using number to specify them. Yarn count refers to the thickness of a yarn and is determined by its mass per unit length or length per unit mass. It is important to know various numbering systems and their relationships in understanding yarn and thread size specifications. Yarn counting system is of two types. They are -

Direct Counting System (Length fixed but weight variable):
  • Tex 
  • Denier
  • Jute Count
Indirect Counting System (Weight fixed but length variable):
  • English
  • Metric
  • Worsted
Tex: The yarn number or count in the Tex system is the weight in grams of 1000m or 1 km of yarn.

Denier: The yarn count in the denier system is the weight in grams of 9000m or 9 km of yarn.
Pounds per Spyndle: The yarn count in pounds per spindle is the weight in pounds of 14,400yards of yarn. This counting system is commonly known as jute count.

English: It is defined as the number of hanks (840 yards) per pounds. It is denoted by Ne.

Metric: It is defined as the number of hanks (1000 m) per kg. It is defined by Nm.
Worsted: It is defined as the number of hanks (560 yards) per pounds.

Lea Count  = 48/ (Pounds/Spyndle)


Usually, Metric count is used to describe synthetic, spun and corespun yarn and  thread while English count is used to specify cotton yarn and thread. Filament or spandex yarn and threads are normally expressed with Decitex or Denier.

As these counts are used frequently therefore see the below table for better understanding


Count Conversion Laws:

Using the table below will enable you to perform a simple conversion from one system to another. 


Yarn Count | Thread Numbering System | Count Conversion Laws

Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

Count: Yarns  as well as threads are expressed using number to specify them. Yarn count refers to the thickness of a yarn and is determined by its mass per unit length or length per unit mass. It is important to know various numbering systems and their relationships in understanding yarn and thread size specifications. Yarn counting system is of two types. They are -

Direct Counting System (Length fixed but weight variable):
  • Tex 
  • Denier
  • Jute Count
Indirect Counting System (Weight fixed but length variable):
  • English
  • Metric
  • Worsted
Tex: The yarn number or count in the Tex system is the weight in grams of 1000m or 1 km of yarn.

Denier: The yarn count in the denier system is the weight in grams of 9000m or 9 km of yarn.
Pounds per Spyndle: The yarn count in pounds per spindle is the weight in pounds of 14,400yards of yarn. This counting system is commonly known as jute count.

English: It is defined as the number of hanks (840 yards) per pounds. It is denoted by Ne.

Metric: It is defined as the number of hanks (1000 m) per kg. It is defined by Nm.
Worsted: It is defined as the number of hanks (560 yards) per pounds.

Lea Count  = 48/ (Pounds/Spyndle)


Usually, Metric count is used to describe synthetic, spun and corespun yarn and  thread while English count is used to specify cotton yarn and thread. Filament or spandex yarn and threads are normally expressed with Decitex or Denier.

As these counts are used frequently therefore see the below table for better understanding


Count Conversion Laws:

Using the table below will enable you to perform a simple conversion from one system to another. 


0 comments:

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