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Coir is a multi-cellular natural bast fiber. It is extracted from the tissues surrounding the seed of the coconut palm. The scientific name of coconut plant is Cocos nucifera. Coir fibers are made from two different types coconut, brown fiber which is obtained from mature coconuts and finer white fiber which is extracted from immature green coconuts after soaking for up to 10 months. Both the raw materials of coconut palm result in fiber types with slightly different characteristics. This coconut plant is truly a source of renewable raw materials for both food and non-food products.

The coconut tree grows in lots of nations of the entire world. But the coir fiber industry is only fully developed in a few countries. Around just 30% of the entirely accessible coconut husks will be highly processed to have coir fiber. Coir fiber production provides work and also revenue to several thousands of countryside, generally poor and rural people in the important producing countries such as India and also Sri Lanka. Coir is also developed far away such as Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam and also South America. Coir fiber production typically takes small place and is a tiny family businesses.

Features of Coir Fiber

1. Coir is a stiff, less flexible and  without softness.

2. Fiber length is up to 35 cm with a diameter of 12-25 microns.

3. This husk fiber contains the maximum amount of lignin among all the other natural fibers.

4. Tensile strength of Coir fiber is low compared to abaca.

5. White coir is made from unripe coconut, brown coir is made from ripe coconut

6. Coir fiber has good resistance to microbial action and salt water damage.

7. This fiber has great affinity to basic dye, acid dye and direct dye.






Application of Coir Fiber

Coir fiber has a great variety of applications at domestic as well as official decorative purpose.

1. It is widely used for floor mats, door mats, brushes, mattresses etc.

2. Common uses for brown coir fiber are in upholstery padding, sacking and horticulture.

3. It is used in handicraft industry and shell of coconut is used for button making as well.

4. This material is also used for electric insulation and packaging.

5. Brown coir fibers together to be used as upholstery padding for automobile industry.

6. This fiber is recommended substitute for sphagnum moss because it is free of bacteria and fungal spores.

7. It is not spoiled into water thus rope can make which is used at ship & boat.

Coir Fiber Properties and Common Application

Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments


Coir is a multi-cellular natural bast fiber. It is extracted from the tissues surrounding the seed of the coconut palm. The scientific name of coconut plant is Cocos nucifera. Coir fibers are made from two different types coconut, brown fiber which is obtained from mature coconuts and finer white fiber which is extracted from immature green coconuts after soaking for up to 10 months. Both the raw materials of coconut palm result in fiber types with slightly different characteristics. This coconut plant is truly a source of renewable raw materials for both food and non-food products.

The coconut tree grows in lots of nations of the entire world. But the coir fiber industry is only fully developed in a few countries. Around just 30% of the entirely accessible coconut husks will be highly processed to have coir fiber. Coir fiber production provides work and also revenue to several thousands of countryside, generally poor and rural people in the important producing countries such as India and also Sri Lanka. Coir is also developed far away such as Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam and also South America. Coir fiber production typically takes small place and is a tiny family businesses.

Features of Coir Fiber

1. Coir is a stiff, less flexible and  without softness.

2. Fiber length is up to 35 cm with a diameter of 12-25 microns.

3. This husk fiber contains the maximum amount of lignin among all the other natural fibers.

4. Tensile strength of Coir fiber is low compared to abaca.

5. White coir is made from unripe coconut, brown coir is made from ripe coconut

6. Coir fiber has good resistance to microbial action and salt water damage.

7. This fiber has great affinity to basic dye, acid dye and direct dye.






Application of Coir Fiber

Coir fiber has a great variety of applications at domestic as well as official decorative purpose.

1. It is widely used for floor mats, door mats, brushes, mattresses etc.

2. Common uses for brown coir fiber are in upholstery padding, sacking and horticulture.

3. It is used in handicraft industry and shell of coconut is used for button making as well.

4. This material is also used for electric insulation and packaging.

5. Brown coir fibers together to be used as upholstery padding for automobile industry.

6. This fiber is recommended substitute for sphagnum moss because it is free of bacteria and fungal spores.

7. It is not spoiled into water thus rope can make which is used at ship & boat.

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http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/Sisal Fibers are just about the most favored healthy fibers obtained by sisal plant. The particular plant, recognized as Agave sisalana. It is a hardy fiber usually extracted from the leaves of the sisal plant as well and naturally grows well at hot and dry climate. Sisal is a member of the agave family, which are hardy plants of arid regions of Central America, Mexico and South West USA. In the past, several species of Agave were used for fibre production, but now A. sisalana is the commercially grown species. Henequen (A. Fourcroydes) is another species of agave that produces fiber, but not of as high quality as A. sisalana.


Every single leaf of the sisal plant includes numerous extended fibers, which may be taken off in the procedure generally known as decortication. The particular fibers could be content spinner into the thread regarding twine in addition to fabric generation, or maybe pulped to produce paper items.

Sisal fibers are usually entirely biodegradable, environmentally friendly composites had been created having soy proteins resin revised having gelatin. Sisal fibers, revised soy proteins resins, in addition to composites had been known with regards to kinetic in addition to energy houses.


Properties of sisal fiber:

1.    Sisal fiber is a lustrous and creamy white fiber.
2.    It measures up to 1 meter in length and with a diameter of 200 to 400 microns.
3.    It is hard and coarse fiber, thus unusual for textile goods in addition to fabrication.
4.    It takes moisture easily and a stronger fiber that others.
5.    Sisal Fiber is extremely long lasting that has a low maintenance with limited usage.
6.    It is Recyclable.
7.    Sisal material is generally obtained from the particular outer leaf skin, eliminating the particular inside pulp.
8.    It is accessible to the weave plaid, herringbone in addition to twill.
9.    Sisal material is generally Anti static, isn't going to attract or lure dust
10.    Sisal Sisal Fiber is extremely long lasting that has a low maintenance with minimal usage.
11.    It is Recyclable.
12.    Sisal material is generally obtained from the particular outer leaf skin color, eliminating the particular inside pulp.
13.    It is accessible to the weave as plaid, herringbone in addition to twill.
14.    Sisal has a fine surface texture thus it is applicable to many common dyestuffs as well.
15.    Sisal exhibits beneficial sound in addition to cushioning properties.
.

Usual Chemical Constituents of Sisal Fiber


Components
Percentage
Cotton
71%
Hemicellulose
18.5%
Lignin
6%
Pectin
2.3%
Fat and Waxes
0.5%
Water Soluble Matter
1.7%

 Total                                                100%



Common Application of Sisal Fiber:


1.    Sisal fiber is a more durable, strengthening, ability to stretch, great attractions towards certain dyestuffs and resistance to deterioration in salt water so it is as used for Agriculture twine as well as a rope (Coil like a roll or braid) .


2.    Sisal is known for the great durability of its yarns, although slight matting of sisal carpeting may occur in high traffic areas.

3.    Sisal does not build up static and does not trap dust, so vacuuming is the only maintenance required.

4.    It is also used in low-cost and specialty paper, dart boards, buffing cloth, filters, Geotextiles, mattresses, carpets, handicrafts, wire rope cores, and Macramé.

5.    Other products developed from sisal fiber include spa products, cat scratching posts, lumbar support belts, rugs, slippers, clothes, and disc buffers.

6.    Sisal wall covering meets the abrasion and tearing resistance standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials and of the National Fire Protection Association.

7.    In recent years sisal has been utilized as a strengthening agent to replace asbestos and glass fiber and is increasingly a component used in the automobile industry, where its strength, "naturalness" and environmentally friendly characteristics are greatly appreciated.

8.    It is also used as a binding material for plaster molding as well as in the construction industry to reinforce plaster in ceilings and walls.

9.    It is used as reinforcement in plastic composite materials, particularly in automotive components, but also in furniture.

10.    Another promising use is as a substitute for asbestos in brake pads. (It is also the best material for making dartboards.)

11.    By-products from sisal extraction can be used for making bio-gas, pharmaceutical ingredients and building material.


(References- wikipedia.org, naturalfibres2009.org, wigglesworthfibres.com)

Sisal Fiber - A widely Used Vegetable Fiber (Properties and Uses)

Posted by Firoz Kabir 1 comment

http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/Sisal Fibers are just about the most favored healthy fibers obtained by sisal plant. The particular plant, recognized as Agave sisalana. It is a hardy fiber usually extracted from the leaves of the sisal plant as well and naturally grows well at hot and dry climate. Sisal is a member of the agave family, which are hardy plants of arid regions of Central America, Mexico and South West USA. In the past, several species of Agave were used for fibre production, but now A. sisalana is the commercially grown species. Henequen (A. Fourcroydes) is another species of agave that produces fiber, but not of as high quality as A. sisalana.


Every single leaf of the sisal plant includes numerous extended fibers, which may be taken off in the procedure generally known as decortication. The particular fibers could be content spinner into the thread regarding twine in addition to fabric generation, or maybe pulped to produce paper items.

Sisal fibers are usually entirely biodegradable, environmentally friendly composites had been created having soy proteins resin revised having gelatin. Sisal fibers, revised soy proteins resins, in addition to composites had been known with regards to kinetic in addition to energy houses.


Properties of sisal fiber:

1.    Sisal fiber is a lustrous and creamy white fiber.
2.    It measures up to 1 meter in length and with a diameter of 200 to 400 microns.
3.    It is hard and coarse fiber, thus unusual for textile goods in addition to fabrication.
4.    It takes moisture easily and a stronger fiber that others.
5.    Sisal Fiber is extremely long lasting that has a low maintenance with limited usage.
6.    It is Recyclable.
7.    Sisal material is generally obtained from the particular outer leaf skin, eliminating the particular inside pulp.
8.    It is accessible to the weave plaid, herringbone in addition to twill.
9.    Sisal material is generally Anti static, isn't going to attract or lure dust
10.    Sisal Sisal Fiber is extremely long lasting that has a low maintenance with minimal usage.
11.    It is Recyclable.
12.    Sisal material is generally obtained from the particular outer leaf skin color, eliminating the particular inside pulp.
13.    It is accessible to the weave as plaid, herringbone in addition to twill.
14.    Sisal has a fine surface texture thus it is applicable to many common dyestuffs as well.
15.    Sisal exhibits beneficial sound in addition to cushioning properties.
.

Usual Chemical Constituents of Sisal Fiber


Components
Percentage
Cotton
71%
Hemicellulose
18.5%
Lignin
6%
Pectin
2.3%
Fat and Waxes
0.5%
Water Soluble Matter
1.7%

 Total                                                100%



Common Application of Sisal Fiber:


1.    Sisal fiber is a more durable, strengthening, ability to stretch, great attractions towards certain dyestuffs and resistance to deterioration in salt water so it is as used for Agriculture twine as well as a rope (Coil like a roll or braid) .


2.    Sisal is known for the great durability of its yarns, although slight matting of sisal carpeting may occur in high traffic areas.

3.    Sisal does not build up static and does not trap dust, so vacuuming is the only maintenance required.

4.    It is also used in low-cost and specialty paper, dart boards, buffing cloth, filters, Geotextiles, mattresses, carpets, handicrafts, wire rope cores, and Macramé.

5.    Other products developed from sisal fiber include spa products, cat scratching posts, lumbar support belts, rugs, slippers, clothes, and disc buffers.

6.    Sisal wall covering meets the abrasion and tearing resistance standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials and of the National Fire Protection Association.

7.    In recent years sisal has been utilized as a strengthening agent to replace asbestos and glass fiber and is increasingly a component used in the automobile industry, where its strength, "naturalness" and environmentally friendly characteristics are greatly appreciated.

8.    It is also used as a binding material for plaster molding as well as in the construction industry to reinforce plaster in ceilings and walls.

9.    It is used as reinforcement in plastic composite materials, particularly in automotive components, but also in furniture.

10.    Another promising use is as a substitute for asbestos in brake pads. (It is also the best material for making dartboards.)

11.    By-products from sisal extraction can be used for making bio-gas, pharmaceutical ingredients and building material.


(References- wikipedia.org, naturalfibres2009.org, wigglesworthfibres.com)

1 comments:

Flax or linen is a multicellular, vegetable bast fiber like jute and hemp. Cellulose is the most part of its composition. 


Physical properties of Linen/Flax

Length: Flax fibers range up to 90 cm.

Diameter: This fiber has an average 12 to 16 micron diameter.

Strength: More than cotton fiber, 5.5 to 6.5 gm/denier.

Elastic Property: Elasticity is too much low. Extension before breaking 2.7 to 3.5%.

Moisture Regain: MR% of linen fiber is 10 to 12%

Abrasion Resistance: Moderate

Color: Yellowish to gray.

Luster: More than cotton fiber, slightly silky.

Heat Resistance: Better than cotton fiber.


Chemical Properties: Like cotton linen/flax fiber is a cellulose polymer, but the structure of it is more crystalline which makes it stronger, crisper and hard to handle and more easily wrinkled. They absorb and release water quickly, making linen comfortable to wear in hot weather. The resistance against concentrated acid is poor but dilute acid can not affect more. It works well though use strong alkali and the cold bleaching agent. It is not affected by mildew and insects as well. Dyeing properties of linen is not so good as cotton or jute, Direct or Vat colors are suitable to dye up this fiber.


Application

The most usual applications of linen/flax fiber

    http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/
  •     Table wear
  •     Suiting
  •     Clothing apparel
  •     Surgical thread
  •     Sewing thread
  •     Decorative fabrics
  •     Bed linen
  •     Kitchen towels
  •     High quality papers
  •     Handkerchiefs
  •     Draperies
  •     Upholstery
  •     Wall coverings
  •     Artists canvases
  •     Luggage fabrics
  •     Panelling
  •     Insulation, filtration
  •     Light aviation use (fabrics)
  •     Reinforced plastics and composites 

It burns without any smell thus it is used for cigarette covering.

Flax/Linen fiber properties and application

Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

Flax or linen is a multicellular, vegetable bast fiber like jute and hemp. Cellulose is the most part of its composition. 


Physical properties of Linen/Flax

Length: Flax fibers range up to 90 cm.

Diameter: This fiber has an average 12 to 16 micron diameter.

Strength: More than cotton fiber, 5.5 to 6.5 gm/denier.

Elastic Property: Elasticity is too much low. Extension before breaking 2.7 to 3.5%.

Moisture Regain: MR% of linen fiber is 10 to 12%

Abrasion Resistance: Moderate

Color: Yellowish to gray.

Luster: More than cotton fiber, slightly silky.

Heat Resistance: Better than cotton fiber.


Chemical Properties: Like cotton linen/flax fiber is a cellulose polymer, but the structure of it is more crystalline which makes it stronger, crisper and hard to handle and more easily wrinkled. They absorb and release water quickly, making linen comfortable to wear in hot weather. The resistance against concentrated acid is poor but dilute acid can not affect more. It works well though use strong alkali and the cold bleaching agent. It is not affected by mildew and insects as well. Dyeing properties of linen is not so good as cotton or jute, Direct or Vat colors are suitable to dye up this fiber.


Application

The most usual applications of linen/flax fiber

    http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/
  •     Table wear
  •     Suiting
  •     Clothing apparel
  •     Surgical thread
  •     Sewing thread
  •     Decorative fabrics
  •     Bed linen
  •     Kitchen towels
  •     High quality papers
  •     Handkerchiefs
  •     Draperies
  •     Upholstery
  •     Wall coverings
  •     Artists canvases
  •     Luggage fabrics
  •     Panelling
  •     Insulation, filtration
  •     Light aviation use (fabrics)
  •     Reinforced plastics and composites 

It burns without any smell thus it is used for cigarette covering.

0 comments:

http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/Linen is the first natural fiber which was produced industrially from flax plant. this fiber obtained from the stems of the plant Linum usitatissimum are used to produce linen fabrics. Linen has been used for thousand of years. Flax is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of Europe, the Swiss lake dweller People produced flax for the fiber and seed. Linen was the preferred textile of the Ancient Egyptians who used it for fabrication, bed linen and mummies were wrapped by it. The Commercial use of linen started in 1753. At present France, China, Belgium and Holland produces most of the fax plant.



Linen processing flow chart


 Rippling
   ↓
Retting
  ↓
Dew-Retting

Dam or water Retting

Chemical Retting

Washing and Drying

Breaking

Scutching

Hackling




Chemical Composition of Linen



Component
Percentage
Cellulose
92%
Hemi-Cellulose
2%
Lignin
4%
Others
2%
Total
100%


Classification of Linen

Linen is classified into two types.

1. Short staple - Comparatively smaller in size and use to uneven linen yarns. It is also called as Tow.
2. Long staple - Longer size fiber, 12 to 20 inches. Used to make finer linen yarn. Alternative name of it is Line.
(Reference- Book: textile fiber and web: binhaitimes.com)

Linen Fiber Processing Flowchart and Chemical Composition

Posted by Firoz Kabir No comments

http://textilerawmaterial.blogspot.com/Linen is the first natural fiber which was produced industrially from flax plant. this fiber obtained from the stems of the plant Linum usitatissimum are used to produce linen fabrics. Linen has been used for thousand of years. Flax is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of Europe, the Swiss lake dweller People produced flax for the fiber and seed. Linen was the preferred textile of the Ancient Egyptians who used it for fabrication, bed linen and mummies were wrapped by it. The Commercial use of linen started in 1753. At present France, China, Belgium and Holland produces most of the fax plant.



Linen processing flow chart


 Rippling
   ↓
Retting
  ↓
Dew-Retting

Dam or water Retting

Chemical Retting

Washing and Drying

Breaking

Scutching

Hackling




Chemical Composition of Linen



Component
Percentage
Cellulose
92%
Hemi-Cellulose
2%
Lignin
4%
Others
2%
Total
100%


Classification of Linen

Linen is classified into two types.

1. Short staple - Comparatively smaller in size and use to uneven linen yarns. It is also called as Tow.
2. Long staple - Longer size fiber, 12 to 20 inches. Used to make finer linen yarn. Alternative name of it is Line.
(Reference- Book: textile fiber and web: binhaitimes.com)

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